Berrien County Small Claims Court

Berrien County Small Claims Court

Hearing Date for my Small Claims Case

In Berrien County, the court selects the hearing date after the defendant responds to the claim. The date for the hearing is generally 15 to 30 days after the defendant files his or her answer.

Filing Procedures for Berrien Small Claims Court cases

The plaintiff (or person filing the action) needs to file a sworn statement with the magistrate court clerk in the proper county. The sworn statement describes the charges made against the defendant (the person or business that is being sued by the plaintiff). The sworn statement should include the following details:

  • The name, address, and telephone number of the plaintiff (and attorney if there is one)(Make sure this is correct as this is how the court will contact you if there are any issues)
  • Name and street address of the defendant (this is what the court uses to serve the defendant)
  • Amount of money plaintiff is seeking (sometimes called damages)
  • Detail why the defendant is being sued (and why this defendant owes the money)
  • Copies of all relevant documents regarding the claim (for example, any contracts, receipts, etc.)
  • Berrien County Small Claims Court

    Berrien County Small Claims Court

    Small Claims courts are also called Magistrate Courts in Berrien County. If a dispute arises between parties that cannot be resolved, a party can file the matter in magistrate court.
    The magistrate or small claims court was designed so that disputes under a certain amount ($15,000) could be handled informally. Because of this, the disputes in this court are handled quickly and inexpensively.

    Berrien County Court Location

    The magistrate court for Berrien County is located at:

    201 N. Davis St. Ste 250
    Nashville, GA 31639

    The magistrate judge is Chief Magistrate Elizabeth C. Carter. The telephone number for the court is: 229-686-7019. The fax number is 229-686-6328.

    How do I appeal a judgment?

    If a party is not satisfied with the court’s decision, that party may file an appeal. The appeal will be heard by either the state or superior court in the county. Either party may request a jury trial for purposes of the appeal (something which is unavailable at the magistrate court level). Appeals must be filed within 30 days of the judge’s decision.

    Which Types of Cases are Usually filed in Berrien County Small Claims Court?

    Here are examples of cases that are often found in small claims court:

    • A tenant refuses to pay for damages which are more than the security deposit
    • Renter fails to pay rent or Owner seeks to evict renter
    • Landlord fails to return the security deposit to the tenant
    • A Merchant fails to address issues with faulty merchandise
    • Borrower refuses to make payments on a loan
    • Dry cleaning business damages or loses items and refuses to pay for damage or loss
  • Unnecessary repairs or work done on a car by a mechanic
  • Procedures for the Hearing

    Some counties require you to go to mediation before a hearing in front of a judge. Mediation is a dispute resolution tool designed to try and resolve the case by meeting with an independent third party who can evaluate the case and try to reach a settlement that is agreeable to all parties. Even if mediation is successful, a plaintiff can still seek to recover court costs. If mediation is not successful, the case will proceed to the hearing. The court will also allow the plaintiff and defendant to question or dispute each other’s evidence during the hearing. When both parties are done, the judge will issue a decision (or judgment). The judge may award damages to the plaintiff, defendant, or both depending on the facts of the case.
    If the plaintiff fails to appear at the hearing, the court may:

    • Allow the defendant to present evidence and render a decision without hearing from plaintiff
    • continue the case.
    • Dismiss the case

    If the defendant fails to appear at the hearing, the court may grant a default judgment against the defendant. The lesson to be learned is make sure you attent the hearing regardless of whether you are the plaintiff or the defendant.

    Defendant’s Counterclaim

    The defendant is able to issue a claim against the plaintiff. This is called a counterclaim. The defendant can file a counterclaim against the plantiff’s original claim if it is related to it, and the total money claimed by the defendant is less than $15,000. The counterclaim will likely be heard the same day as the plaintiff’s claim.

    Defendant’s Time to Answer

    After the case is filed the court clerk serves the defendant with a copy of the claim along with a summons. After that, the defendant has thirty days to respond or answer the claim.

    Default Judgments

    If the defendant fails to answer the claim or appear at the hearing, the judge can issue a default judgment without hearing from defendant. If a default judgment is entered, the plaintiff is awarded the amount that was requested in the claim along with court costs. If the plaintiff is asking for non-monetary damages (like property), the court has to conduct a separate hearing to determine the dollar amount of the damages. The defendant has a 30 day window to respond to plaintiff’s claim. If the defendant fails to respond, the defendant is in default.

    How should I prepare for the hearing?

    The following steps are recommended to prepare for the hearing:

    • Collect all the documents you need for your case. Also prepare extra copies for the judge and other party (or parties)
    • Communicate with any witnesses you intend to call to prove your case. Confirm they are available on the day of the hearing.
    • If you need to bring in a witness to prove your case and the witness is not being cooperative with you, prepare a subpoena.
    • If in preparing your documents you find that you need additional documents, you can subpoena documents from other parties as well.
    • A subpoena is a documnt which can be completed by you and issued by the court which commands a person to appear in court and may require them to bring certain documents to court as well.
    • A subpoena can be obtained from the clerk’s office of the Magistrate Court for Berrien County.

      Can I hire an attorney for my Berrien County Small Claims Court case?

      In County cases, you may hire an attorney to represent you but are not required to do so. You are able to file the case on your own, without the assistance of an attorney (again, the process was designed to be inexpensive). Small Claims court judges are heard and decided without a jury. Mediation is a tool that is sometimes used to help resolve a case without a trial. Some counties offer this as a service, and some counties require a case be sent to mediation prior to it being heard at a trial.

      Is Berrien County the “proper” County for my case?

      If you are suing a person, you must file the case in the County where they live. If the defendant lives in Berrien County, you can file the case in this County. If you are suing a corporation, you must file your case in the County where the registered agent for service of process is located. (Contact the Corporations Division of the Secretary of State either online or at 404-656-2817 to find out if a business is a corproation and the name and address of the registered agent). If the business you are suing is unincorporated, you should file the case in the County where the business is physically located.
      The plaintiff must also pay a filing fee which is submitted along with the initial paperwork (the sworn statement). This filing fee includes the cost for the clerk to serve one defendant. The filing fee varies by each county but is generally between $45 and $55. If an additional defendant is named in the action, there will be an extra charge for the court to serve the additional party. This extra charge could be between $25 and $35.
      The Berrien County Clerk for the Magistrate Court can help you complete the necessary forms but CANNOT give legal advice. A clerk would be able to review your forms to make sure there is a signature in the appropriate blanks but will not be able to tell you which party you should sue. Also, the clerk will not be able to tell you if they think you will win.

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